Comcast Helps CU Denver To Launch A New Academic Facility

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Innovative Academic Facility

The $5 million donation from Comcast Corporation to the University of Colorado was used by the University to launch an innovative academic facility, which is dedicated to technology and media. Philadelphia-based Comcast Corporation is the largest cable service provider in Colorado region, and employs over 8,000 people in this region.

Comcast offered the fund to the University to invest in their future workforce. However, this latest academic facility will also help the students to mix skills. The officials at Comcast Corporation believe that students should learn to mix skills, as it will come in handy in the real world.

The senior vice president and general manager of Comcast Technology Solutions, Matt McConnell said, “At the core, the value to us is interdisciplinary mixed with business, arts and applied engineering. That’s what attracted us to this.”

The latest innovative academic center, which is named as Comcast Media and Technology Center, is actually a 1,900 square foot space and is located at the Tivoli Student Union on the Auraria Campus of CU Denver. Reports say that the academic facility will open in March.

At present, the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences is working together with the College of Arts & Media to develop a new curriculum for their students for the fall. Comcast and many other businesses have ensured that they will offer staff experts to make this new venture a success.

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The executive director of Project X-ITE, Erik Mitisek said, “Innovation has led our institutions of higher ed for a long time. But when you think about the advent of mass acceptance of human design being part of critical student problem-solving and creative ideas, that’s a new concept. In Boston and elsewhere, education has been deeply focused on really putting students in the path of all disciplines.”

The co-director of the new center, Brian DeLevie, who is also the associate professor of visual arts in the College of Arts and Media, appreciated the initiative from Comcast. “Right now, the university would say we have the skills but no degree,” DeLevie said. “The storytelling, emotional response and game play tend to reside in the arts, animation and design. But there’s a large amount of technology to make hair look like hair and fluid look like fluid.”

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